Maine Stormwater Conference

Speaker Bios

Monday, November 16 –  Water Wise Municipal Leaders

10:00 – 11:30 Session I – Clean Water: The Way Life Should Be

Round table discussion with Maine municipal managers

1:00 – 2:30 Session II – Investing in Clean Water

Maine municipal leaders and Long Creek watershed business owners

3:00 – 4:30 Session III – Achieving Healthy Economies, Clean Water, and Thriving Communities

3:00 – 3:30
Clean Water Case Study I: South Portland, ME
James Gaily, South Portland, ME

Jim has been the City Manager for the City of South Portland since 2007, stepping up from the Asst. City Manager position at that time.  Jim holds a B.A. in Geography and a M.A. in Public Policy and Management as well as many professional certifications.  Having grown up in South Portland, Jim started part-time with the City in 1986 in the Recreation Department and since that time has worked in nine different positions in five city departments.  Forward thinking, Jim continues to explore ways of making South Portland the best community in New England to live, work and recreate.

3:30 – 4:00
Clean Water Case Study II: Orono, ME
Belle Ryder, Town of Orono, ME

Belle Ryder is the Assistant Town Manager for the Town of Orono. Among other duties, Ms. Ryder manages the Education & Outreach program for the Town’s Stormwater Program as well as assisting the Public Works Director with administering the rest of the MS4 program. Ms. Ryder has been a leader in integrating the MS4 program with all levels of municipal government, from the planning process and construction inspections to educating Council to developing poster competitions for K-12 students.

Prior to beginning her municipal career in 2012, Ms. Ryder was the Operations Manager for Union River Boat Company and a sales engineer for Hercules, Inc. Ms. Ryder received her B.Sc. in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Maine.

4:00 – 4:30
Clean Water Case Study III: Franklin, MA
Brutus Cantoreggi, Franklin, MA

Robert (Brutus) Cantoreggi, DPW Director, Franklin, MA, has been at the forefront of stormwater compliance and innovation for several years and has been a highly sought speaker, guest and round table member at numerous conferences and symposiums on stormwater regulations and compliance. Some of the conferences Brutus has spoken at include those held by NEWEA, APWA, EPA, CRWA and the Maine Stormwater Conference in So. Portland. Brutus attends NEWEA’s annual Washington DC fly-in to help promote and support New England’s initiatives before our Congressmen. Brutus was awarded the 2013 Rita Barron Public Official Award by the Charles River Watershed Association for his efforts and advocacy for protection of the Charles River. He received the award in recognition of his efforts to incorporate green infrastructure in a variety of public works projects undertaken by Franklin in the last few years. Under Mr. Cantoreggi’s leadership, these projects will help reduce phosphorous from Franklin from entering the river and will contribute to a cleaner and healthier Charles in the coming years.


Monday, November 16 – Planning & Ordinance

10:00 – 11:30 Session I – Planning for $uccess

10:00 – 10:30
Envisioning Better Communities: Seeing More Options, Making Wiser Choices
Randall Arendt, Greener Prospects

Randall Arendt is a landscape planner, site designer, author, lecturer, and an advocate of “conservation planning.” He received his B.A. degree from Wesleyan University (magna cum laude and Phi Beta Kappa) and his M.Phil. Degree in Urban Design and Regional Planning from the University of Edinburgh, Scotland, where he was a St. Andrew’s Scholar. He is Senior Conservation Advisor at the Natural Lands Trust in Media, Pennsylvania, and is the former Director of Planning and Research at the Center for Rural Massachusetts, University of Massachusetts at Amherst, where he also served as an Adjunct Professor. In 2003 he was elected a Fellow of the Royal Town Planning Institute in London. In 2004 he was named an Honorary Member of the American Society of Landscape Architects, and in 2005 he received the American Institute of Architects’ Award for Collaborative Achievement. In 2008 he received an honorary degree in Landscape Planning and Design by the Conway School of Landscape Design, in Conway, Massachusetts. Mr. Arendt has designed “conservation subdivisions” for a wide variety of clients in 21 states and several Canadian provinces. His designs are “twice green” because they succeed both environmentally and economically. Achieved in a “density-neutral” manner, they respect landowner equity and allow developers to build at the legal density, but require significant conservation through more compact layouts.

10:30 – 11:00
Plan to Save: Early adoption of enhanced local stormwater regulations could provide substantial cost savings in the Oyster River Watershed, NH
James Houle, University of New Hampshire Stormwater Center

James Houle is the Program Director at the UNH Stormwater Center and is involved in the design and implementation of innovative stormwater control measures, low impact development (LID) and green infrastructure (GI) planning and implementation, operation and maintenance, and water resource monitoring.

Bill Arcieri, VHB

Bill Arcieri is a Senior Project Manager at Vanasse Hangen Brustlin, Inc., providing water quality and stormwater management services to multiple clients to address permitting natural resource protection and asset management needs.

11:00 – 11:30
Going Green!  The City of Newburyport’s Plan for the Future
Jennifer Lachmayr, ARCADIS

Ms. Lachmayr is a Principal in Charge and Business Development Manager in the Water Division of ARCADIS. She is located in their Wakefield MA office. Ms. Lachmayr received her engineering degree from Cornell University and is a registered professional engineer in all New England States. She has over 25 years of experience in municipal projects including watershed planning and improvement implementation. Ms. Lachmayr is active in several organizations including APWA, NEWWA, WEF, AWWA, and serves as a WEF Delegate at Large and on the executive committee for NEWEA.

1:00 – 2:30 Session II – Stormwater. Where is it going?

1:00 – 1:30
A Retrospective Assessment of Local LID Requirements in South Portland, ME
Fred Dillon, City of South Portland, Maine

For over 25 years, Fred has worked in various professional capacities to protect water resources. He began his career with the Falmouth Water Pollution Control Department where he was employed for 15 years. During this time he received an undergraduate degree in Environmental Studies from the University of Southern Maine. Fred then worked as a graduate research assistant for 2½ years on a microbial source tracking (MST) project at the Wells National Estuarine Research Reserve while completing the Community Planning & Development Program at the Muskie School of Public Service. Following the MST project, Fred was employed for six years as a Project Manager on dozens of watershed restoration initiatives for the environmental consulting firm FB Environmental. Fred currently works as the City of South Portland’s Stormwater Program Coordinator where he oversees compliance with state and federal stormwater regulations and urban stream restoration efforts.

 Steve Puleo, City of South Portland, Maine

Steve has been the Community Planner for South Portland since 2004.  In that role he manages all subdivision, site plan and ordinance review processes, as well as on-site inspections, and assists in long range planning goals through the GIS land use management program.  He works closely with the City’s Manager, Economic Development Director, Planning and Development Director, and Code Officer to attract specific businesses and industries to the City.  Steve facilitates stakeholder meetings and workshops to solicit community input and consensus building, and develops and offers public ordinance compliance training.  In addition, he manages ongoing projects and provides research and analysis of economic measures and indicators. A 1999 Muskie School Community Planning and Development graduate, Steve has continued his work by informing municipal decision makers of the importance of planning for stormwater impacts caused by site development. Steve is on the front lines of site development in the City of South Portland and is required to advise and review stormwater management plans as part the City’s site plan review for developments.

1:30 – 2:00
Ellsworth Rain Clouds Know No Boundaries
Michele Gagnon, City of Ellsworth, Maine

Michele Gagnon has worked as the Ellsworth City Planner since 2001. Prior to her employment with the City, Ms. Gagnon worked for the Eastern Maine Development Corporation in Bangor as a Land Use Planner and a Community Development Specialist.  Ms. Gagnon has a Master’s Degree in Land Use Planning and Regional Development from University Laval in Quebec, Canada, where she is from.

2:00 – 2:30
Setting the Standard: Protecting Priority Watersheds and Encouraging Responsible Development 
Jennie Franceschi, formerly City of Biddeford, Maine

Jennie, a Civil Engineer, was previously employed as the City of Biddeford’s first Planning Engineer, and was with the City for over 13 years.  In this capacity, she was responsible for all Planning permit technical reviews, and site inspections of development projects.   She performed the yearly reporting of Phase II NPDES MS4 Permit and managed MDOT funded road work.  She coordinated the design & construction efforts for the City’s RiverWalk pathway along the Saco River, and project managed the creation of the Thatcher Brook Watershed Management Plan.  A 1996 graduate of UMO, she credits her parents with her career success.  Jennie resides in Westbrook with her husband Paul, and their son Ryan who is an avid hockey player.  She recently joined the District in August 2015.

3:00 – 4:30 Session III – Planning for Change

3:00 – 3:30
Examining Recent Temperature and Rainfall Trends in New England and Its Impact on Flood Frequency

David Vallee, NOAA/NWS/Northeast River Forecast Center

David Vallee is the Hydrologist-in-Charge of the National Weather Service’s Northeast River Forecast Center.  The center provides detailed water resource and life-saving flood forecasting services to National Weather Service Forecast Offices and the hundreds of federal, state and local water resource entities throughout the Northeast and New York.   

David has worked for the National Weather Service for 28 years, serving in a variety of positions including Senior Service Hydrologist at the Taunton Weather Forecast Office from 1993-2000 and as Science and Operations Officer from 2001-2006.   David has extensive experience leading hydrometeorological forecast and warning operations and directing weather research and training programs.  David’s research activities span a variety of topics including flooding, severe weather forecasting and orographically enhanced heavy rainfall in southern New England.   David has served as the NWS lead investigator with the State University of New York, at Albany, on a multi-year project addressing Land Falling Tropical Cyclones in the Northeastern United States.  This has improved the forecasting of heavy precipitation associated with these land falling tropical cyclones as well as developing a better understanding the mechanisms which lead to the recurvature and rapid acceleration of tropical cyclones as they approach the Northeast.   David led the initiative to develop a short-range ensemble river forecast system which leverages short range numerical weather prediction guidance to drive a suite of probabilistic river forecasts for the region.  Recently, David has been leading an effort at the Northeast River Forecast Center to examine changes in precipitation and temperature patterns across New England and its impact on flood behavior. 

David is most known locally for his outreach and education work on the behavior of New England Hurricanes, including many appearances on local radio and T.V. networks as well as the Weather Channel, the History Channel and the Discovery Channel.  David has been the recipient of numerous regional and national awards including the prestigious National Isaac Cline Award for Leadership.  

David is a graduate of graduate of Lyndon State College.  He is a life-long resident of the Rhode Island, living in the northeast part of Cumberland, with his wife and two sets of teenage twins!   He considers it a tremendous privilege to be serving the people of the very region he calls home.

3:30 – 4:00
Integrating Storm Surge and Sea Level Rise Vulnerability Assessments and Criticality Analyses Into Asset Management at MDOT
Sam Merrill, GEI Consultants

Dr. Sam Merrill has extensive experience with local community needs, managed landscapes, and sensitive natural resources, and is a recognized leader in next generation approaches to benefit-cost analysis for climate adaptation purposes. He has published over 20 peer-reviewed articles and over 60 agency technical reports, and has received many awards for his work – including in 2000 a military medal for distinguished public service, the highest honorary award presented by to private citizens by the US Department of Defense; an Environmental Merit Award from the US EPA in 2014; and most recently a 2015 Visionary Award from the Gulf of Maine Council. He has been the principal force behind development of the COAST approach to benefit-cost analysis for sea level rise and storm surge and its implementation in numerous coastal adaptation planning efforts.

4:00 – 4:30
Building Bath to Last: Considering Sea Level Rise when Designing the Future
Andrew Deci, City of Bath, Maine

Andrew Deci is the Director of Planning & Development for the City of Bath, Maine. Originally from Virginia, he relocated to Maine in 2011 after five years working as a planner in Spotsylvania County, Virginia. His professional interests include cultural resource planning and management, vernacular architecture, crime prevention through environmental design, sustainability, and climate adaptation planning. For the City, Andrew is responsible for all planning activities, management of the city’s bus and trolley system, and co-manages the information services functions. Andrew attended Mary Washington College in Fredericksburg, VA and has a degree in Historic Preservation. He and his wife live and work in Maine’s Cool Little City–Bath. He is a member of the Congress for the New Urbanism, Maine Association of Planners, and is a Board Member of Main Street Bath, Inc. and Coastal Trans, Inc.


Monday, November 16 – Green Infrastructure / LID

10:00 – 11:30 Session I – Hittin’ The Streets With GI

10:00 – 10:30
Green Streets Lessons Learned from Philadelphia and New York
Fernando Pasquel, ARCADIS

Fernando Pasquel is Director of Stormwater & Watersheds for ARCADIS. He is a water resources manager with more than 30 years of experience developing and implementing watershed and stormwater management programs. He has a BS and MS in Civil Engineering from Virginia Tech and a Masters in Project Management from the University of Pittsburgh’s Katz Graduate School of Business.

Mark Van Auken, ARCADIS

Mark Van Auken serves as Stormwater/MS4 Discipline Leader for ARCADIS. His 25 years of experience includes stormwater flow monitoring, sampling, modeling, permitting, asset management, green infrastructure, design, analysis, and management. He has led NPDES Storm Water Phase I and II permitting related projects for 17 MS4 communities in six states. He has a BS in Civil Engineering from Michigan State University.

10:30 – 11:00
Greening the Black
Bethany Eisenberg, VHB

Bethany Eisenberg is a key industry leader in facilitating the coordination of the most current technical and regulatory information regarding the design, installation and maintenance of permeable pavements.  Bethany’s work with private clients, municipalities, regulatory agencies, transportation agencies including State DOTs and Airports specifically, has exposed her to the practical aspects of managing stormwater as well as what is necessary to coordinate different groups, with different operational, budgetary and regulatory concerns.  Her work as the lead Chair for the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) Environmental and Water Resources Institute Permeable Pavement Technical Committee allowed her the opportunity to work with the leaders in permeable pavement design and use currently working in academia, government agencies, industries and engineering firms nationally and internationally. Backed by VHBs team of engineers, scientists, graphic designers, the ASCE committee prepared a comprehensive book on Permeable Pavements released in April of 2015.  The book was designed by VHB to be produced an E-Book and a Hard Copy book. Graphics were custom prepared by VHB and were used in National ASCE Webinars and trainings. In addition to research and training, VHB has successfully completed permeable pavement projects for private and public sector clients. This work continues VHB’s commitment to being leaders in implementing innovative green infrastructure techniques such as bioretention plantings, pervious pavements, and other Best Management Practice tools.

Ms. Eisenberg is also a key author/contributor on the Transportation Research Board (TRB) Interlocking Permeable Concrete Specifications committee which is finalizing a national ASCE Technical Specification for the design and installation of permeable Interlocking Concrete Pavement. She has recently completed more than four ASCE Educational Webinars on the Selection, Design and Maintenance of Permeable Pavements. She recently completed specification development for pervious concrete and is involved in ongoing monitoring of the successfully completed Porous Asphalt Alley Demonstration project, designed by VHB, in the City of Boston.

11:00 – 11:30
The Big Green Apple
Ginny Roach, CDM Smith

Virginia Roach is a Vice President at CDM Smith with 30 years of experience addressing stormwater management, CSO and wastewater issues for municipal and private clients. She was a contributing author to the WEF 2012 Design of Urban Runoff Controls Manual of Practice, as well as the recently published WEF Green Infrastructure Implementation manual.  Ms. Roach holds an M.S. in Civil Engineering and a B.S. in Civil/Environmental Engineering from Worcester Polytechnic Institute, as well as a B.A. in Mathematics from the College of the Holy Cross.

1:00 – 2:30 Session II – GI: The Next Generation

1:00 – 1:30
Volume Reduction in Systems Not Designed for Volume Reduction
Tom Ballestero, University of New Hampshire Stormwater Center

Dr. Ballestero is the Director of the Stormwater Center at the University of New Hampshire. He has licensure as a Professional Engineer, Professional Hydrologist, and Professional Geologist. He has been with UNH since 1983 where he teaches courses in hydrology and water resources engineering. His research interests include stormwater management, stream restoration, and groundwater hydrology.

1:30 – 2:00
Engineered Biofilter for Advanced Green Infrastructure
Daniel Bourdeau, Geosyntec

Mr. Bourdeau is a registered professional engineer experienced in civil and water resource engineering. As a water resource engineer, Mr. Bourdeau has been trained in water and wastewater treatment process design, hydrologic processes, hydraulics, erosion and sediment control, constructed treatment wetland design and restoration, and water quality analysis. He has expertise in stormwater design, including retrofit low impact development design of constructed wetlands and bioretention facilities. He also has extensive experience in developing phased erosion and sediment control plans for large construction sites and linear projects.

2:00 – 2:30
Real-time Control: The Next Generation of “Smart” Green Infrastructure
Andrea Braga, Geosyntec

Andrea Braga is a Senior Engineer at Geosyntec Consultants in Brookline, Massachusetts. She has over 10 years’ experience in water resources engineering, specializing in the design and implementation of low impact development practices. She has extensive experience in watershed hydrologic and hydraulic modeling. She has managed a variety of projects, including overseeing one of the firm’s largest projects for nationwide construction stormwater audits. She has also been involved in urban and highway stormwater BMP design, monitoring, protocol development, and data analysis through her continued involvement in the Low Impact Development and Pervious Pavement Committees of the Environmental Water Resources Institute.

3:00 – 4:30 Session III – Are There Holes in Porous Pavement

3:00 – 4:30
Panel Discussion
Tom Ballestero, University of New Hampshire Stormwater Center

Dr. Ballestero is the Director of the Stormwater Center at the University of New Hampshire. He has licensure as a Professional Engineer, Professional Hydrologist, and Professional Geologist. He has been with UNH since 1983 where he teaches courses in hydrology and water resources engineering. His research interests include stormwater management, stream restoration, and groundwater hydrology.

Bethany Eisenberg, VHB

Bethany Eisenberg is a key industry leader in facilitating the coordination of the most current technical and regulatory information regarding the design, installation and maintenance of permeable pavements.  Bethany’s work with private clients, municipalities, regulatory agencies, transportation agencies including State DOTs and Airports specifically, has exposed her to the practical aspects of managing stormwater as well as what is necessary to coordinate different groups, with different operational, budgetary and regulatory concerns.  Her work as the lead Chair for the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) Environmental and Water Resources Institute Permeable Pavement Technical Committee allowed her the opportunity to work with the leaders in permeable pavement design and use currently working in academia, government agencies, industries and engineering firms nationally and internationally. Backed by VHBs team of engineers, scientists, graphic designers, the ASCE committee prepared a comprehensive book on Permeable Pavements released in April of 2015.  The book was designed by VHB to be produced an E-Book and a Hard Copy book. Graphics were custom prepared by VHB and were used in National ASCE Webinars and trainings. In addition to research and training, VHB has successfully completed permeable pavement projects for private and public sector clients. This work continues VHB’s commitment to being leaders in implementing innovative green infrastructure techniques such as bioretention plantings, pervious pavements, and other Best Management Practice tools.

Ms. Eisenberg is also a key author/contributor on the Transportation Research Board (TRB) Interlocking Permeable Concrete Specifications committee which is finalizing a national ASCE Technical Specification for the design and installation of permeable Interlocking Concrete Pavement. She has recently completed more than four ASCE Educational Webinars on the Selection, Design and Maintenance of Permeable Pavements. She recently completed specification development for pervious concrete and is involved in ongoing monitoring of the successfully completed Porous Asphalt Alley Demonstration project, designed by VHB, in the City of Boston.

Peter Newkirk, Maine Department of Transportation

Peter has 29 years of experience in planning, design and construction of water quality and quantity control, and land use conservation practices.  He has been the supervisor of  the Surface Water Quality Unit, Environmental Office at MaineDOT from 2000 to present, interrupted by four and one half years from 2010 to 2014  as an environmental engineer in the River Unit, Division of Watershed Protection, MaineDEP.  Before coming to MaineDOT, he served 14 years with the USDA, Natural Resources Conservation Service as a field engineer and District Conservationist in Maine and New Hampshire.


Monday, November 16 | 8:30 – 9:30 a.m.

Keynote Address: What Towns Need: Observations From 25 Years on the Stormwater Beat
Chet Arnold, NEMO Program Co-Founder, Director of Outreach UConn Center for Land Use Education and Research (CLEAR)

Chet Arnold is an Extension Educator and the Director for Outreach of the University of Connecticut Center for Land Use Education and Research (CLEAR), a partnership of the Department of Extension, the Department of Natural Resources and the Environment, and the Connecticut Sea Grant Program.  Chet has been with the University since 1987, and has worked on the Long Island Sound Study Public Outreach Program, the NEMO Program, the National NEMO Network, and CLEAR – all of which he helped to create.  He has authored several national award-winning papers and has been Principal Investigator or Co-Principal Investigator on over $14M of external grants.  As the Center’s Director of Outreach, Chet focuses on the integration and dissemination of CLEAR land use research, geospatial tools and training, and outreach programs to best serve CLEAR’s municipal and other audiences.  His specialty is harnessing the talent of his younger and more intelligent colleagues and taking credit for their work.


Tuesday, November 17 – Policy

8:30 – 10:00  Session IV – Emerging Issues

8:30 – 9:00
Permit Coverage Not Enough?
Caroline Hampton, VHB

Caroline is a Registered Professional Engineer with more than 20 years’ experience in water resource policy, permitting and engineering. She focuses on water quality, hydraulics, hydrology design and Clean Water Act compliance specialties for a variety of clients. Most recently, she has focused on assisting state transportation and agency officials in building robust programs that provide compliance with EPA’s and state specific NPDES MS4 stormwater permit.

9:00 – 9:30
Healthy and Resilient Watersheds: What’s in the Way? What’s Possible?
Trish Garrigan, EPA

Trish has been at EPA for over twenty five years. She is the Regional Healthy Watersheds Coordinator and is currently in the Wetlands Unit.  She has worked on issues related to wetlands, drinking water, watershed management, green infrastructure, sustainability, and adaptation.  Currently, she is part of a team working on a regional database to track Resilience and Adaptation in New England (RAINE) and is working with the Resilient Taunton Watershed Network. Prior to working at EPA, Trish worked at the MA Department of Environmental Protection and the MA Executive Office of Environmental Affairs. She has a MS in Water Resources Management from the University of Wisconsin- Madison, and a BA in Environmental Science from SUNY Plattsburgh.  


9:30 – 10:00
The Federal Government’s Approach to Climate Change
Bill DeLong, Department of Homeland Security

Protective Security Advisor assigned to the State of Maine. PSA mission is to proactively engage with Federal, State, local and Tribal mission partners and private sector stakeholders to protect the Nation’s critical infrastructure. 28 years of government service with the Navy, State of Maine and the Department of Homeland Security.

10:30 – 12:00 Session V – Stormwater: The National & Regional Perspective

10:30 – 11:30
National Policy Update and Stormwater Touchpoints
Brenna Mannion, National Association of Clean Water Agencies

Brenna Mannion is the Director of Regulatory Affairs and Outreach for the National Association of Clean Water Agencies (NACWA). A licensed professional engineer, she works with federal agencies and nationwide on behalf of communities implementing stormwater management programs and to garner national support for innovative management techniques like green infrastructure. Brenna holds a BS in Civil Engineering from the University of Notre Dame, and is based in D.C. 

11:30 – 12:00
The Great Race: New England States Forge Ahead with Stormwater Program Implementation
Richard Claytor, Horsley Witten Group

Mr. Claytor has more than 30 years of experience in the field of water resource assessment, watershed planning, stormwater management design, and land use management. He is currently the President with the Horsley Witten Group (HW) located in Sandwich, MA. He directs a group of engineers, planners and scientists involved in engineering design, land use planning, watershed management and water resource planning projects. Prior to joining HW, Rich was the Principal Engineer for the Center for Watershed Protection, a national non-profit environmental organization, located in Ellicott City, Maryland. He authored a number of guidance documents on watershed planning, stormwater management and smart site design. Rich has a BS in Civil Engineering from Union College, in Schenectady, NY, he is a LEED accredited professional, a Registered Professional Engineer in Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New York and Maryland, and a Massachusetts Approved Soil Evaluator.

2:30 – 4:00 Session VI – Stormwater: The Main(e) Perspective

2:30 – 4:00
Panel Discussion
Maine DEP Staff


Tuesday, November 17 – Watershed Management

8:30 – 10:00 Session IV – What’s up in the Creek: An Update on the Long Creek Restoration Effort

8:30 – 10:00
Panel Discussion
Long Creek Watershed Management District staff

10:30 – 12:00 Session V – Expanding the Toolbox: Approaches to Watershed Assessments

10:30 – 11:00
The Ability of Streams to Withstand the Effects of Urbanization
Tom Danielson, Maine Department of Environmental Protection

Tom Danielson is a Biologist with the Maine Department of Environmental Protection’s Biological Monitoring Unit.  Tom specializes in evaluating the health of streams, rivers, and wetlands.  He also coordinates the development of nutrient criteria for fresh waters.  Prior to coming to Maine, Tom was an Ecologist with the Wetlands Division of the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency in Washington, DC.  Tom earned a Ph.D. in Ecology and Environmental Sciences from the University of Maine, a Master of Environmental Management from Duke University, a Master of Public Policy from Duke University, and B.S. in Wildlife Biology from the University from Massachusetts, and a B.B.A in Finance from the University of Massachusetts.   

11:00 – 11:30
A Method for Subwatershed Prioritization: Sebago Lake and the Water Quality Index
Kate McDonald, Cumberland County Soil & Water Conservation District

Kate McDonald joined Cumberland County Soil & Water Conservation District as a project scientist in 2011. She divides her time between the Long Creek Watershed Management District monitoring program and watershed planning and implementation projects throughout Cumberland County. Prior to joining the District she worked in environmental consulting for 11 years focusing on hazardous waste site investigation and remediation.

11:30 – 12:00
Defining Maximum Extent Practicable to Meet Watershed-Scale Receiving Water Quality Goals
Renee Bourdeau, Geosyntec

Ms. Bourdeau has nine years of experience in the application of civil engineering and water resources engineering. As a water resources engineer, she has worked on permitting and design of numerous stormwater management controls with a focus on low impact development (LID) and green infrastructure (GI) techniques. She is also experienced in a wide range of ecological and biological assessments, including wetland delineation, vegetation surveys, macroinvertebrates, amphibians/reptiles, fish sampling, bird identification, and water quality sampling. Ms. Bourdeau has particular expertise in hydrologic and hydraulic stormwater modeling and the design, implementation and construction of stormwater management controls for multiple applications including residential, commercial, and industrial. She has been involved with monitoring of best management practices including statistical analysis of hundreds of monitoring studies as part of the International BMP Database. She has been involved in the development of various stormwater best management practice manuals including the Boston Water and Sewer Commission Stormwater Management Manual for urban and ultra-urban environments; the Low Impact Development Manual for Orange County, Florida and the New York Department of Environmental Conservation Guidance for Phosphorus Removal. Ms. Bourdeau prepares land use permitting submittals including erosion and sediment controls plans, post construction stormwater management plans, operation and maintenance plans, and stormwater pollution prevention plans. She has conducted third-party audits of commercial and institution sites for compliance with local, state and federal requirements including audits of eleven (11) Veterans Affair (VA) Hospitals in Pennsylvania. Ms. Bourdeau provided stormwater master plan review and recommendations for the VA Hospitals as well as recommendations for maintenance and future build out. Ms. Bourdeau was the Project Manager in the development of a watershed scale Integrated Plan to meet upcoming NPDES municipal stormwater and wastewater regulations for three communities in coastal New Hampshire. This effort includes evaluation of various green infrastructure treatment strategies based on land use, effective treatment and cost. This Integrated Plan will be one of the first to cross municipal boundaries.

Rob Roseen, Horsley Witten

Dr. Roseen is an Associate in Water Resources Engineering at Geosyntec Consultants in Portsmouth, NH. Rob has 20 years of experience in the investigation, design, testing, and implementation of innovative approaches to stormwater management. Rob was director of the University of New Hampshire Stormwater Center between 2004 until 2012. His broad area of expertise includes water resources engineering, stormwater management, low-impact development (LID) design, and porous pavements. Rob has led the technical analysis of studies on integrated planning for stormwater and wastewater as well as examining land use and climate change impacts upon municipal flooding. He has participated in many significant and award winning green infrastructure projects.

2:30 – 4:00 Session VI – The Pinch of Salt: Winter Maintenance Impacts on Water Resources

2:30 – 3:00
Pass the Salt, Hold the Liability
Patrick Woodbrey, New Hampshire Department of Environmental Services

Patrick graduated from Umaine Orono in 2008 with a B.S. in Environmental Management and Policy. After Umaine he lived in Plymouth, NH for four years working for a company that recycled waste products for use as agricultural fertilizers. He recently spent two years in Sun Valley, ID working for the City of Ketchum Street Department during the winter, gaining hands on experience in the snow removal process.  Patrick is currently the Salt Reduction Coordinator at the New Hampshire Department of Environmental Services.

3:00 – 3:30
Research and BMP Installation Considerations at a Municipal Snow Dump Facility
James Houle, UNHSC

James Houle is the Program Director at the UNH Stormwater Center and is involved in the design and implementation of innovative stormwater control measures, low impact development (LID) and green infrastructure (GI) planning and implementation, operation and maintenance, and water resource monitoring.

Dan Bourdeau, Geosyntec 

Daniel Bourdeau, P.E., CPESC, CPSWQ, a civil and water resource engineer for Geosyntec based in New Hampshire.

3:30 – 4:00
Between a Rock and a Hard Place: How Bedrock Fracture Affects Chloride Transport
Mark Holden, Maine Department of Environmental Protection

Mark Holden has worked for the Maine Department of Environmental Protection since 1994. He presently works as an Environmental Specialist for the Division of Environmental Assessment within the Bureau of Land and Water Quality. He has been certified by the State of Maine as a Geologist since 1997. He worked for Amoco Production Company as an exploration geophysicist for eight years before coming to Maine. He lives in Rockport with his family and likes to work on wooden boats in his spare time.


Tuesday, November 17 – LID In South Korea hosted by NE IECA

8:30 – 10:00 Session IV – LID Research

8:30 – 8:52
Development of Management System for Addressing Stormwater in South Korea
Jongsoo CHOI

Research Fellow, Land & Housing Institute, LH

Jungmin LEE

Research Fellow, Land & Housing Institute, LH

8:52 – 9:14
Investigation and Analysis of Public Perceptions for the Comprehensive Application of Low Impact Development in Korea
Seok-Hwa LIM; Mi-Hong LEE; Kyoung-Hak HYUN

9:14 – 9:36
Korean LID/GI Research and Verification Facility at Pusan National University
Hyunsuk SHIN

Professor, Pusan National University

9:36 – 10:00
The Verification Method Used to Model LID/GI System Effectiveness at the Korean LID/GI Research Facility
Hyunsuk SHIN

Professor, Pusan National University

Youngsu JANG; Mieun KIM; Sungje YE; Chilho NAM

10:30 – 12:00 Session V – LID Analysis

10:30 – 10:52
Challenges in Seoul Metropolitan for Restoring Urban Water Cycle
Reeho KIM; Jung-hun LEE; Daehee LEE; Muhammad SHAFIQUE

10:52 – 11:14
Analyzing the Changes to the Hydrologic Cycle with the Implementation of LID Techniques in Korea
Jungmin LEE

Research Fellow, Land & Housing Institute, LH

Jongsoo CHOI

Research Fellow, Land & Housing Institute, LH

Kyunam JIN; Yungsang LEE

11:14 – 11:36
Performance Evaluation of Permeable Pavement Systems in Korea
Hyunsuk SHIN

Professor, Pusan National University

Jaehun AHN; Hyangseon JUNG

11:36 – 12:00
Analysis of Runoff Reduction and Hydrologic Cycle Utilizing LID Concepts
Jongpyo PARK

Director, HECOREA. INC.

Lee KYOUNGDO

CEO, HECOREA. INC.

HyunSuk SHIN

Professor, Pusan National University

2:30 – 4:00 Session VI – LID in the Community

2:30 – 2:52
Development of LID Facility Decision Support System using Multiple Attribute Decision Making (MADM) Method
Lee KYOUNGDO

CEO, HECOREA. INC.

Jongpyo PARK

Director, HECOREA. INC.

Jungmin LEE

Research Fellow, Land & Housing Institute, LH

Jongsoo CHOI

Research Fellow, Land & Housing Institute, LH

2:52 – 3:14
Effects of Calcium Chloride on Plant Growth in LID Vegetated Roadside Low Impact Development Facilities in Korea
Eun-Yeob LEE; Kyoung-Hak HYUN

3:14 – 3:36
FEM Analysis of the Effect of Road Side Infiltration Swales on Structural Stability of the Road System
Jong-Suk JUNG, Jin-Woo SONG, Kyoung-Hak HYUN

3:36 – 4:00
Evaluation of the Economic Benefits of Low Impact Development Techniques on Stormwater Management
Hyunsuk SHIN

Professor, Pusan National University

Mieun KIM


Tuesday, November 17 | 1:15 – 2:15 p.m.

Keynote Address: Thinking Outside the Catch Basin
Ken Moraff, Director of the Office of Ecosystem Protection, EPA Region 1

Ken Moraff is director of the Office of Ecosystem Protection at EPA’s New England regional office, with responsibility for federal clean air and water programs in the six New England states.  He has led major environmental projects including the Boston Harbor and Charles River cleanups, and has helped EPA develop innovative approaches to complex challenges including nutrient pollution and contaminated stormwater runoff.  Ken previously served as manager of EPA-New England’s enforcement program, where he developed strategies which integrated enforcement and compliance assistance to improve industry’s environmental performance.  He began his EPA career as an enforcement attorney and a Special Assistant to the Regional Administrator, and also worked for the City of Cambridge, MA on affordable housing issues.  He is a graduate of Cornell University and Harvard Law School.

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